you are now in hive mind

I’ve been doing this work a long, long time.

What work is that? you ask.

I’ve been doing the work of spiritual integration.

I call myself a transformation coach, because I am in the work of transformation. Not simple transformation, where one goes from one state to another. I think of the butterfly analogy so many of us love when I think of regular, old transformation. Look, the caterpillar became a butterfly! Yes, it did. But that’s not all that happened.

All that nasty stuff happening inside the chrysalis? That’s where I come in. I’m not interested in turning caterpillars into butterflies. That kind of transformation is not in my hands. But all the inside nastiness, the melting of the physical body, the complete loss of one’s former identity…that’s the stuff I can help with.

I think many people associate transmutation with transformation and the two don’t really have anything to do with one another. Transmutation is changing negative into positive. Transformation is understanding there is no negative or positive, only illusion/delusion and the waking up from it.

Ultimately, those who seek clarity will go through the process of transformation, with or without coaching support. Those who seek reality will transform. The butterfly analogy is quite unfair, really. Both the caterpillar and the butterfly already live in reality.

The other day, a friend shared a dream she had. I shared a similar dream I’d had the night before. I told her the dreams felt collective and wondered how many others had had a similar dream over those couple of days. She reached out to another friend and found out that friend had also had a similar dream.

As a dreamwalker, I know that dreams are not as personal as many of us like to believe. In my life, dreams often teach me. They tell me what’s going to happen in the future (often years ahead of time), they tell me what’s happening in the present (especially if there is conflict happening behind the scenes that I need to be mindful of ), and they give me insight into what humanity is processing as a whole.

Collectively, we are processing a lot of energetic turmoil. The times we are currently in remind me, energetically, of the 1960s. During that decade, people all around the world were waking up to how little power they had in the systems around them and they were demanding more. This was a world-wide phenomenon; a collective awakening.

Today, we are in the midst of another collective awakening and I will tell you why: we never finished the work from the 1960s. We became afraid, we became drug addicts, we became stagnant. But, the work is never over until it is. In transformation work, this is always true: you will keep getting presented with opportunities until you take them and keep doing your work. Doing anything halfway is fine. It can be part of your process. No one gets to judge your process.

But process means the work is not over.

A lot of leaders, especially spiritual leaders, will focus upon transmutation right now. They will encourage us to attempt to step out of the pain and into the glory. But, what about all the inner messiness that occurs in-between pain and glory? What about all the pain and sadness and anger and hopelessness and guilt and shame that needs to be part of the process? That feeds the process? If we just transmute it, we don’t integrate the lessons. We don’t actually do the work.

Your emotions are not simply “bad” feelings. Your emotions are teachers. They are neither bad nor good. They are information.

When you turn away from the information in your life, can you actually change anything?

I think the 60s are calling. Maybe we need to stop trying to “transmute that shit” and pick up the phone.

parenting teens without breaking down

Once upon a time, I gave birth to four humans within five years, one at a time. It was a ton of fun and I completely immersed myself  in my mothering role. I loved that no day was ever the same, as I am easily bored in this life. Parenting four, young children day-in and day-out rarely bored me and I spent the time doing a lot of healing from my own childhood.

I remember standing in my kitchen when the youngest of the four was around age one and thinking to myself I cannot wait until they are teenagers! I will have four teens at the same time! I can’t wait to see what they try to get away with and what they think they know! To say that parenting was my jam would be a gross understatement.

But, then, I actually had teenagers. Continue reading

what holds your talking stick?

A talking stick is sometimes utilized in community settings where different people will get a chance to speak. The understanding is that only the person holding the stick will speak; others will take the important opportunity to truly hear the speaker and respond at the appropriate time.

This is an old practice that has come to us from many, different directions. It is a way of keeping order amongst humans, who have a tendency to become disordered rather easily. Especially when someone says something they don’t want to hear.

One of the reasons I enjoy communicating through social media is that it operates like a talking stick. You cannot talk until I have had my say. There is a lot of potential for healing and clarity in social media, but it depends upon intention and use, does it not? A simple tool in the wrong hands will become a great weapon. Continue reading

momming with the Gospel

One of the reasons I enjoy reading Christian parenting books is because I love being a parent. Since 2005, I have read probably close to 100 books on parenting. I have read the insights of parenting coaches, other parents, grandparents. I have been a parenting coach, myself, and taught some classes in San Francisco when my youngest was a baby. Parenting is my passion.

More than just parenting diligently, I want to be able to have my children say I parented them well. Basically anyone can be a parent; not everyone is a good parent. My latest book on parenting, Gospel Centered Mom: The Freeing Truth About What Your Kids Really Need by Brooke McGlothlin, offered me a chance to read a parenting book that was more rooted in personal struggle than I’m used to. It was an interesting change.

Continue reading